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2 edition of Interpretation of split ergativity and related patterns. found in the catalog.

Interpretation of split ergativity and related patterns.

Scott DeLancey

Interpretation of split ergativity and related patterns.

by Scott DeLancey

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Published by Indiana University Linguistics Club in Bloomington .
Written in English


ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14506862M

  Ergativity. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press. DOI: /CBO E-mail Citation» An important book developed from the Dixon article, providing additional updates and details. Discusses historical, semantic, and discourse-based motivations for ergativity and problems posed for theoretical work on ergativity. Part of the Studies in Natural Language and Linguistic Theory book series (SNLT, volume 65 Comrie, B. ‘Reflections on verb agreement in Hindi and related languages.’ DeLancey, S. ‘An interpretation of split ergativity and related patterns.’ Langu CrossRef Google Scholar. Dixon, R. M. W.

The book begins with an analysis of syntactic ergativity, which as Polinsky argues, is a manifestation of the PP-ergative type. Polinsky discusses diagnostic properties that define PPs in general and then goes to show that a subset of ergative expressions fit the profile of PPs.   The book begins with an analysis of split person marking patterns in Chol, a Mayan language of southern Mexico. Here appearance of split ergativity follows naturally from the fact that the progressive and the imperfective morphemes are verbs, while the perfective morpheme is not. The fact that the nonperfective morphemes are verbs, combined.

Publisher: MIT/The University of Texas at Austin Publication date: Number of pages: Language:English/CholThe central claim of this dissertation is that aspect-based split ergativity does not mark a split in how Case is assigned, but rather, a split in sentence structure. Specifically, I argue that the contexts in which we find the appearance of a nonergative pattern in an otherwise. Split-Ergativity EDITH ALDRIDGE 1 Introduction A long-standing puzzle in the study of ergative languages is the phenome-non of NP split-ergativity. In the Pama-Nyungan language Dyirbal, case-marking on 3rd person arguments follows an ergative-absolutive pattern. Transitive subjects take the ergative suffix gu, while transitive objects -.


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Interpretation of split ergativity and related patterns by Scott DeLancey Download PDF EPUB FB2

AN INTERPRETATION OF SPLIT ERGATIVITY AND RELATED PATTERNS SCOTT DELANCEY University of Colorado Nominative/absolutive case and verb agreement are, in many languages, indicators of a category which is here called VIEWPOINT: the perspective from which the speaker describes the event.

The order of NP constituents in a sentence encodes ATTENTION. Get this from a library. An interpretation of split ergativity and related patterns.

[Scott DeLancey; Indiana University Linguistics Club.]. In linguistic typology, split ergativity is a feature of certain languages where some constructions use ergative syntax and morphology, but other constructions show another pattern, usually conditions in which ergative constructions are used varies from language to.

DOI: / Corpus ID: An Interpretation of Split Ergativity and Related Patterns @inproceedings{DelanceyAnIO, title={An Interpretation of Split Ergativity and Related Patterns}, author={Scott Delancey}, year={} }. An interpretation of split ergativity and related patterns.

An example of split ergativity conditioned by tense and aspect is found in the Hindi-Urdu language, which has an ergative case on subjects in the perfective aspect for transitive verbs in the active voice, while in other aspects (habitual, progressive) subjects appear in the nominative case.

Example sentences for Hindi-Urdu are. In linguistic typology, ergative–absolutive alignment is a type of morphosyntactic alignment in which the single argument ("subject") of an intransitive verb behaves like the object of a transitive verb, and differently from the agent of a transitive verb.

Examples are Basque, Georgian, Mayan, Tibetan, a few Indo-European languages (such as the Kurdish languages and Hindi) and, to some. In languages with aspect-based split ergativity, one portion of the grammar follows an ergative pattern, while another shows a split.

In this book, Jessica Coon argues that aspectual split ergativity does not mark a split in how case is assigned, but rather, a split in sentence structure. Ergativity refers to a grammatical pattern in which the logical subject of intransitive clauses and the logical object of transitive clauses share some grammatical features, and in this respect differ from transitive subjects.

issues such as grammatical relations, transitivity, aspect, person, case, and agreement, a clear and integrated.

Book Series; Journals & Yearbooks. New serials; Latest issues; Currently in production; Catalog. An interpretation of split ergativity and related patterns.

Language – Deriving split-ergativity in the progressive: The case of Basque. In Alana Johns. She finished her PhD at MIT in and then spent one year as a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University. Jessica has worked on topics including ergativity, split ergativity, verb-initial word order, and agreement, with a special focus on Mayan languages.

Her book Aspects of Split Ergativity was published by OUP in The book begins with an analysis of split person marking patterns in Chol, a Mayan language of southern Mexico. Here appearance of split ergativity follows naturally from the fact that the progressive and the imperfective morphemes are verbs, while the perfective morpheme is not.

The account provided here argues that these progressive forms pattern as expected in an ergative grammar, once their syntactic structure is considered in detail. In this respect, the account derives an apparent case of split ergativity without resort to the notion of a “case split”.

That is, without necessarily assuming that a. In languages with aspect-based split ergativity, one portion of the grammar follows an ergative pattern, while another shows a split. In this book, Jessica Coon argues that aspectual split ergativity does not mark a split in how case is assigned, but rather, a split in sentence structure.

On the basis of modification and coordination patterns, I argue that person-based split ergativity in Nez Perce requires a syntactic analysis. Comparison of the Nez Perce data with recent findings by Legate () reveals variation among languages showing person-based split ergativity: some languages require a morphological analysis, and some.

Under this analysis, all predicates in Chol show an ergative-absolutive pattern of agreement. The illusion of split ergativity results from the nominalization of the semantic predicate, along with.

Split Ergativity in Warlpiri⁄ Julie Anne Legate Harvard University 1 Introduction This paper has two goals. The first is to provide a structural analysis of Warlpiri split ergativity, in lieu of an analysis based on nonconfigurationality as in Jelinek (). The second is to demonstrate that morphological absolutive case may mask distinct.

In languages with aspect-based split ergativity, one portion of the grammar follows an ergative pattern, while another shows a "split." In this book, Jessica Coon argues that aspectual split ergativity does not mark a split in how case is assigned, but rather, a split in sentence structure.

Specifically, the contexts in which we find the appearance of a nonergative pattern in an otherwise. I begin with an analysis of split person marking patterns in Chol, a Mayan language of southern Mexico. Book. Jan ; An Interpretation of Split Ergativity and Related Patterns.

Article. Ergativity, Valency and Voice Gilles Authier, Katharina Haude (eds.) This volume is a collection of articles concerned with the typology of valency and valence change in a large and diversified sample of languages that display ergative alignment in their grammar. Aspect-based split ergativity refers to splits in agreement or morphological case which are the result of different syntactic structures.

The review presents a brief description of split ergativity by way of introduction. The book is presented in two parts with seven chapters. Content of each chapter is presented and discussed.

Indo-Aryan languages are often described as ergative or split-ergative. The article investigates the extent of this claim, by looking at a number of constructions in 22 New Indo-Aryan languages. It is shown that ergative constructions are in general the minority, and that other mechanisms of alignment, such as transitivity-indicating agreement patterns, are as valuable to be studied as.SUMMARYThis paper investigates three problems related to the phenomenon of split ergativity in several Indo-Iranian languages.

(1) In ergative tenses Pashto and Kashmiri belong to the canonical ergative-absolutive type — irrespective of the definiteness of the nominal P(atient) — while Sindhî and LahndS pattern erga-tively only if P is indefinite.